The year in review: Ten ways you worked in 2015

It’s been a busy year here at Dropbox, so it’s hard to believe 2015 is almost over. Teamwork was a big focus for us this year, with the introduction of the Dropbox badge, the team feature, and a preview of Dropbox Paper. And you played a huge part, helping make this year such a productive one. But how were you using Dropbox tools? We decided to take a look at the data to find out how much people are using Dropbox and see what it says about global work patterns.

How we did it: We analyzed anonymized, aggregated usage activity from Dropbox users across the world between December 2014 and November 2015 to determine how many hours, on average, individual users used Dropbox each week. We then looked at activity by country to see how different regions compare.

Here are the top ten observations we’ve made about how you worked, based on the numbers:

  1. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Americans took a break the week of November 23 for Thanksgiving. But what’s surprising is that most of the world did as well.
  2. January 2015 was a very productive month for South American countries, especially compared to their Northern Hemisphere counterparts.
  3. Perhaps taking a little time to soak in the sun, Europe takes a break in late July.
  4. Americans apparently come back recharged after summer vacations, hitting their Dropbox activity peak in September and October.
  5. France takes Bastille Day seriously. On July 14, the country’s Dropbox usage dropped 21% compared to the previous four Tuesdays. A couple more holiday-related drops: UK went down 20% on Easter Monday (April 6), and the US, naturally, had a 19% drop on Labor Day (September 7).
  6. When French students went back to school the week of August 31, the country saw a 24% increase in Dropbox usage.
  7. Tuesdays are the most active day of the week (by both number of users and hours active per user), while Saturdays are the least.
  8. The end of the week is the time to share, with the most shared links and shared folders created on Dropbox on Fridays.
  9. October is the most active month, while January is the least. But October can’t claim the most active day of the year—November 30.
  10. The top months for students (based on accounts with .edu email addresses) are October and February. And the least active? July.

Wondering how your country’s Dropbox usage ebbed and flowed? Here’s how much the world worked, country by country, week by week, over the past year (the darker the blue, the more activity in a country that week):

Visualization created courtesy of d3js.org

So here’s to you, and everything you got done over the past year, with Dropbox at your side. We look forward to all the great things you’ll do in 2016!