Adding IPv6 connectivity support to the Dropbox desktop client

Computers on the internet are uniquely identified by an IP address. For decades the world has used Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), which allows for about 4 billion unique addresses. As more of the world has come online, and we carry internet-capable devices in our pockets, we have run out of IPv4 addresses. Layers and layers of workarounds have been built to mitigate the problem. The current protocol—Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)—fixes various problems with IPv4; it has a significantly expanded address space that allows for the creation of many more unique IP addresses. Unfortunately, IPv6 has suffered from lack of adoption.

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Accelerating Iteration Velocity on Dropbox’s Desktop Client, Part 2

In our previous blog post on investing in the Desktop Client platform at Dropbox, we discussed the challenges of trying to innovate and iterate on a product while maintaining high platform quality and low overhead. In 2016, Dropbox quadrupled the cadence at which we shipped the Desktop Client, releasing a new a major version every 2 weeks rather than every 8 weeks by investing in foundational improvements. These efforts tended to illustrate one or both of the following themes:

  1. Reduce KTLO work: “Keeping The Lights On,” or KTLO, includes manual tasks such as setting configuration parameters,

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Accelerating Iteration Velocity on Dropbox’s Desktop Client, Part 1

Motivation

Imagine you’re an engineer working on a new product feature that is going to have a high impact on the end user, like the Dropbox Badge. You want to get quick validation on the functionality and utility of the feature. Each individual change you make might be relatively simple, like a tweak to the CSS changing the size of a font, or more substantial, like enabling the Badge on a new file type. You could set up user studies, but these are relatively expensive and slow, and are a statistically small sample size. Ideally,

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DropboxMacUpdate: Making automatic updates on macOS safer and more reliable

Keeping users on the latest version of the Dropbox desktop app is critical. It allows our developers to rapidly innovate, showcase new features to our users, maintain compatibility with server endpoints, and mitigate risk of incompatibilities that may creep in with platform/OS changes.

Our auto-update system, as originally designed, was written as a feature of the desktop client. Basically, as part of regular file syncing, the server can send down an entry in the metadata that says, “Please update to version X with checksum Y.” The client would then download the file, verify the checksum, open the payload,

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