RunBMC: OCP hardware spec solves data center BMC pain points

Open source is not just for software. The same benefits of rapid innovation and community validation apply to hardware specifications as well. That’s why I’m happy to write that the v1.0 of the RunBMC hardware spec has been contributed to Open Compute Project (OCP). Before I get into what BMCs (baseboard management controllers) are and why modern data centers are dependent on them, let’s zoom out to what companies operating at cloud scale have learned.

Cloud software companies like Dropbox have millions, and in some cases, billions of users. When these cloud companies started building out their own data centers,

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The (not so) hidden cost of sharing code between iOS and Android

Until very recently, Dropbox had a technical strategy on mobile of sharing code between iOS and Android via C++. The idea behind this strategy was simple—write the code once in C++ instead of twice in Java and Objective C. We adopted this C++ strategy back in 2013, when our mobile engineering team was relatively small and needed to support a fast growing mobile roadmap. We needed to find a way to leverage this small team to quickly ship lots of code on both Android and iOS.

We have now completely backed off from this strategy in favor of using each platforms’ native languages (primarily Swift and Kotlin,

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Redux with Code-Splitting and Type Checking

Before We Get Started

This article assumes a working knowledge of Redux, React, React-Redux, TypeScript, and uses a little bit of Lodash for convenience. If you’re not familiar with those subjects, you might need to do some Googling. You can find the final version of all the code here.

Introduction

Redux has become the go-to state management system for React applications. While plenty of material exists about Redux best practices in Single Page Applications (SPAs), there isn’t a lot of material on putting together a store for a large, monolithic application.

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Incrementally migrating over one million lines of code from Python 2 to Python 3

The Dropbox desktop client is relied on by millions of users across the world to save their most important files and keep them in sync across their devices. Weighing in at over 1 million lines of Python logic, we had a massive surface area for potential issues in our migration from Python 2 to Python 3. In this process, we knew that we had to be worthy of the trust that users place in Dropbox and keep their information safe.

Over the last few months, we’ve explored why and how we rolled out our Python 3 migration,

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Building better compression together with DivANS

Compressing your files is a good way to save space on your hard drive. At Dropbox’s scale, it’s not just a good idea; it is essential. Even a 1% improvement in compression efficiency can make a huge difference. That’s why we conduct research into lossless compression algorithms that are highly tuned for certain classes of files and storage, like Lepton for jpeg images, and Pied-Piper-esque lossless video encoding. For other file types, Dropbox currently uses the zlib compression format, which saves almost 8% of disk storage.

We introduce DivANS,

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Balancing open source and proprietary IP—they can co-exist

Open source software can provide significant benefits to an organization—it can decrease product development time, distribute development across a community, and attract developers to your organization. It’s because of these benefits that we at Dropbox love open source. However, some organizations shy away from it due to perceived risks and fears around lost intellectual property (IP) rights. You’re not alone if you’re worried that once you’ve incorporated open source into your products or open sourced your own code that you’ve surrendered control over your most valuable assets, or worse, left your organization vulnerable to litigation with no defensive weapons to counter the threat.

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